Dem Deutschen Volke

Deutsche Frauen, deutsche Treue,
Deutscher Wein und deutscher Sang
Sollen in der Welt behalten
Ihren alten schönen Klang,
Uns zu edler Tat begeistern
Unser ganzes Leben lang.

In total, Ernst Jünger was wounded 14 times during the Great War, including five bullet wounds. He was awarded the Iron Cross 1st Class and was the youngest ever recipient of the Pour le Mérite.”Jünger stated that “Time only strengthens my conviction that it was a good and strenuous life, and that the war, for all its destructiveness, was an incomparable schooling of the heart..”
The following is an excerpt from his memoir, “Storm of Steel”:
"A ring of British and Germans surrounded us and called on us to drop our weapons. In my feeble voice, I called upon the men near me to fight on. They shot at friend and foe….there was the only choice between captivity and a bullet…my hurried movements pushed the blood from my lungs in bright spurts. I could breathe more easily, and started running along the trench…except for Schläger and me and a couple of others, everyone went down…at my ear I heard the voice of corporal Hengstmann, a tall blond lower saxon: ‘I’ll take you on my back, sir, either we’ll get through or we won’t!’…after a few bounds, a soft metallic buzz indicated that Hengstmann had stopped one. He collapsed gently under me, making no sound…this discouraging example didn’t deter the next volunteer from making a bid to rescue me. This was sergeant Strichalsky of the Medical Corps. He put me on shoulders, and, while a second shower of bullets whistled aroung us, he carried me safely to the shelter.”

In total, Ernst Jünger was wounded 14 times during the Great War, including five bullet wounds. He was awarded the Iron Cross 1st Class and was the youngest ever recipient of the Pour le Mérite.”
Jünger stated that “Time only strengthens my conviction that it was a good and strenuous life, and that the war, for all its destructiveness, was an incomparable schooling of the heart..”

The following is an excerpt from his memoir, “Storm of Steel”:

"A ring of British and Germans surrounded us and called on us to drop our weapons. In my feeble voice, I called upon the men near me to fight on. They shot at friend and foe….there was the only choice between captivity and a bullet…my hurried movements pushed the blood from my lungs in bright spurts. I could breathe more easily, and started running along the trench…except for Schläger and me and a couple of others, everyone went down…at my ear I heard the voice of corporal Hengstmann, a tall blond lower saxon: ‘I’ll take you on my back, sir, either we’ll get through or we won’t!’…after a few bounds, a soft metallic buzz indicated that Hengstmann had stopped one. He collapsed gently under me, making no sound…this discouraging example didn’t deter the next volunteer from making a bid to rescue me. This was sergeant Strichalsky of the Medical Corps. He put me on shoulders, and, while a second shower of bullets whistled aroung us, he carried me safely to the shelter.”

  • 5 February 2013
  • 44