Dem Deutschen Volke

Deutsche Frauen, deutsche Treue,
Deutscher Wein und deutscher Sang
Sollen in der Welt behalten
Ihren alten schönen Klang,
Uns zu edler Tat begeistern
Unser ganzes Leben lang.

The Battle of the Ice, also known as the Battle of Lake Peipus, was a battle between the Republic of Novgorod and the Livonian branch of the Teutonic Knights (on April 5, 1242, at Lake Peipus). The battle is notable for having been fought largely on the frozen lake and marked the end of Catholic campaigns against the Orthodox Novgorod Republic and other Russian territories for the next century.
According to the Livonian Order's Livonian Rhymed Chronicle, written years later:
"The [Russians] had many archers, and the battle began with their bold assault on the king’s men [Danes]. The brothers’ banners were soon flying in the midst of the archers, and swords were heard cutting helmets apart. Many from both sides fell dead on the grass. Then the Brothers’ army was completely surrounded, for the Russians had so many troops that there were easily sixty men for every one German knight. The Brothers fought well enough, but they were nonetheless cut down. Some of those from Dorpat escaped from the battle, and it was their salvation that they fled. Twenty brothers lay dead and six were captured."

The Battle of the Ice, also known as the Battle of Lake Peipus, was a battle between the Republic of Novgorod and the Livonian branch of the Teutonic Knights (on April 5, 1242, at Lake Peipus). The battle is notable for having been fought largely on the frozen lake and marked the end of Catholic campaigns against the Orthodox Novgorod Republic and other Russian territories for the next century.

According to the Livonian Order's Livonian Rhymed Chronicle, written years later:

"The [Russians] had many archers, and the battle began with their bold assault on the king’s men [Danes]. The brothers’ banners were soon flying in the midst of the archers, and swords were heard cutting helmets apart. Many from both sides fell dead on the grass. Then the Brothers’ army was completely surrounded, for the Russians had so many troops that there were easily sixty men for every one German knight. The Brothers fought well enough, but they were nonetheless cut down. Some of those from Dorpat escaped from the battle, and it was their salvation that they fled. Twenty brothers lay dead and six were captured."

  • 29 April 2012
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